Bathroom breaks are fast. Maybe making your point should be too.

People consume information fast. Especially new visitors to your website.

Blame the Internet! Or maybe thank it?

Too many options. Billions of sites. Tons of funny videos. Compete against kittens. And omg…there’s even videos of people crushing stuff!

How can you compete?

You need to express your ideas quickly.

People scan like robots

Deny it if you want, but we are all scanners. You and your target audience.

At the mall, we browse. Watching TV, we surf. And the same goes for the Internet.

Until something peeks enough of our attention, we will keep “flipping,” “changing,” or whatever you call it.

This isn’t a bad thing for you. It’s just how people work. And so embrace it. Use it to your advantage.

Short sentences prevent reader zone-out. Short sentences also give the reader the impression like they learn a lot quickly.

That’s rewarding.

Some short sentence help readers and you too

According to the Usability.gov experts, sentences should not be more than 20 words. I hope I’m not breaking the rule in this post.

So what can you do?

For me, I write type out my ideas. I notice that when I’m first speaking or writing about anything, I say more than necessary.

But now that it’s out of my head, I can start playing around and get rid of unneeded words.

Another good thing about short sentences is that they help you become more focused on your target audience with punchy words.

You become a little more receptive to how you are using keywords and making sure your points get across quickly.

Death to the long sentence

Back in the day, you could write long sentences for your college professor. My Master’s thesis was full of them. But online, it won’t work.

Kill the long sentence.

Online, you can get away with writing as you speak. It’s okay to start sentences with “and,” “but,” “or” if it makes things clear and brief.

Maybe I just started a war with my 7th grade English teacher.

Is short the new long? Umm..that sounds cheesy.

But put a short sentence next to a long sentence. Which one will you read first?

Enough said.

Thanks for reading!